HMONG STUDIES RESOURCE NEWSLETTER September/October 2004

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG RESOURCE CENTER OF THE HMONG CULTURAL CENTER

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Resource Newsletter provides up-to-date information about new
works in Hmong Studies and Hmong-related research resources. To access back issues of this unique online
publication visit: http://www.hmongcenter.org/hccnewsletter.html

ABOUT THE HMONG RESOURCE CENTER:

The work of the Hmong Resource Center is to provide information to Hmong and non-Hmong for the purpose of
promoting positive race relations, human rights, multicultural education, information about cross-cultural health and
medicine, teacher education, family literacy education and community-based research. The Hmong Resource
Center of the Hmong Cultural Center is open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 AM – 6 PM. The Hmong
Resource Center is located in the Hmong Cultural Center’s offices at 995 University Avenue, Suite 214 in Saint
Paul. Phone: 651-917-9937. E-Mail: resources@hmongcenter.org. Online Resource Center Catalog: www.
hmongcenter.org/ or www.hmongcenter.com/ Walk-ins are welcome and there are many displays to look at that
teach about the Hmong people, their history, their culture and their experience in the U.S. over the past 25 years.
Larger group tours and educational sessions may be arranged in advance.

The Hmong Cultural Center and its Resource Center serves as the Hmong representative organization on the
Council of Advisors of Tolerance Minnesota.

RECENT RESOURCE CENTER ACQUISITIONS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Books/Theses

Saykao, Pao. (2004). How the CIA Found the Hmong. Hmong Issue Series: 1(2). Self-published by the Author. 56
Pages. This publication provides a detailed historical account of how the Central Intelligence Agency established a
working relationship with Hmong leaders in Laos in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Academic Articles

Falk, Catherine. (2004). “The Private and Public Lives of the Hmong Qeej and Miao Lusheng.” In The Hmong of
Australia: Culture and Diaspora. Eds. Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee. Canberra, Australia: Pandanus Books,
Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, 123-152. This article proposes
that Hmong present the Qeej in two very different settings. One is for Hmong audiences at Hmong funerals. The
other is for broader audiences at outdoor performances at New Year and other festivals. The author describes the
role and use of the Qeej in these divergent settings by both the Hmong and the dominant society to assess
numerous ways in which the Hmong present themselves as a minority and a marginalized group both to themselves
and others.

Jarkey, Nerida. (2004). “Process and Goal in White Hmong.” In The Hmong of Australia: Culture and Diaspora.
Eds. Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee. Canberra, Australia: Pandanus Books, Research School of Pacific and
Asian Studies, The Australian National University, 175-190. This linquistic study examines how processes that have
intrinsic and extrinsic goals are represented in the White Hmong language and discusses the ways in which the
representation of these processes in Hmong differs from English.

Julian, Roberta. (2004). “Living Locally, Dreaming Globally: Transnational Cultural Imaginings and Practices in the
Hmong Diaspora.” In The Hmong of Australia: Culture and Diaspora. Eds. Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee.
Canberra, Australia: Pandanus Books, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National
University, 25-58. This article assesses the impact of globalization processes on Hmong identity in the Tasmania
region of Australia. The author examines key components of Hmong cultural identity as well as Hmong-Australian
identity and the role of non-local forces such as Hmong language videos, international Hmong politics and Hmong
literature in influencing Hmong identity in Tasmania.

Lee, Gary Yia. (2004). “Culture and Settlement: The Present Situation of the Hmong in Australia.” In The Hmong of
Australia: Culture and Diaspora. Eds. Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee. Canberra, Australia: Pandanus Books,
Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, 11-24. This article presents a
temporal overview of Hmong settlement trends, occupational and social mobility, and community life in Australia.

Liamputtong, Pranee Rice. (2004). “Being a Woman: The Social Construction of Menstruation Among Hmong
Women in Australia.” In The Hmong of Australia: Culture and Diaspora. Eds. Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee.
Canberra, Australia: Pandanus Books, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National
University, 153-174. This article discusses the cultural construction of menstruation among Hmong women. The
author conducted ethnographic interviews with 27 Hmong women residing in Melbourne, Australia and also
interviewed several Hmong traditional healers about healing methods used for menstruation pain.

Tapp, Nicholas. (2004). “Hmong Diaspora in Australia.” In The Hmong of Australia: Culture and Diaspora. Eds.
Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee. Canberra, Australia: Pandanus Books, Research School of Pacific and Asian
Studies, The Australian National University, 59-96. This article examines connections between Hmong in Australia
and diaspora Hmong communities in China, Southeast Asia, France and the United States. Much of the piece
focuses on the use of the internet by Hmong to build a “global voluntary public diasporic culture” and the
significance of this trend for interaction and identification among the Hmong diaspora in different countries
throughout the world.

Wronska-Friend, Maria. (2004). “Globalized Threads: Costumes of the Hmong Community in North Queensland.” In
The Hmong of Australia: Culture and Diaspora. Eds. Nicholas Tapp and Gary Yia Lee. Canberra, Australia:
Pandanus Books, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, 97-121. This
research study assesses the contemporary situation of Hmong clothing and jewelry in Australia in relation to its
manufacture, supply and utilization along with its function as a token form of gift that provides connections among
the worldwide diaspora of Laotian Hmong.

RECENT RESOURCE CENTER VISITORS:

Several groups have received tours and participated in multicultural education presentations about the Hmong at
the center and out in the community over the past several weeks. These groups have included:

Professor Linda Devendish’s Multicultural Education course at the University of Saint Thomas

Staff of the Saint Paul Foundation

Staff of East Metro OIC (Saint Paul)

Scholars and students utilizing the center over the past several weeks have included:

Dia Cha, Professor of Ethnic Studies at Saint Cloud State University used the center to access recent scholarly
work pertaining to Hmong music and Hmong cultural artifacts

Mo Chang of the Saint Paul Public Schools visited the center to look at recent research pertaining to Hmong
women.

Her Vang, a PhD Candidate at the University of Minnesota visited to find resources pertaining to Hmong history

Peter Vang, a student at Concordia University, Saint Paul visited to find resources related to the Hmong experience
during the Vietnam War

COMPREHENSIVE HMONG STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHIES ARE ONLINE:

Looking for research articles or books about the Hmong? 30 comprehensive and frequently updated Hmong
Studies bibliographies are online at:

http://www.hmongstudies.org/hmonbibbytop.html

The Hmong Resource Center’s online catalog lists items in the center’s collections which include more than 300
books, 600 journal articles, 200 theses and dissertations, 200 videos and thousands of newspaper articles:

http://site.yahoo.com/hmongcultural/enlanmatbyto.html

HMONG RESOURCE CENTER NOW AN AFFILIATE OF THE MN STATE DATA CENTER AND THE U.S. CENSUS
BUREAU:

The Hmong Resource Center has recently become an affiliate of the Minnesota State Data Center and the U.S.
Census Bureau. The goal of this partnership is to make U.S. census products more accessible to the Hmong and
Southeast Asian American population. The Resource Center is home to the Southeast Asian American Census
Information Center. The Southeast Asian American Census Information Center at our Saint Paul offices provides
quick access to researchers of population, socioeconomic, education, and demographic 2000 census data for
Hmong, Cambodian, Lao and Vietnamese in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Minneapolis, St. Paul, suburban communities,
the entire Twin Cities metropolitan area and the U.S. as a whole.

The Resource Center has also recently posted a step-by-step tutorial for accessing Hmong census data online:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/howtofinhmon.html

The Resource Center’s comprehensive Hmong census report and scholarly analysis compiled in partnership with
Hmong National Development and 5 scholars will be released in the near future.

HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL:

The Hmong Resource Center is a sponsor of the online Hmong Studies Journal which is the only peer reviewed
academic journal related to the growing discipline of Hmong Studies. The journal will be putting out its fifth volume
in the Fall of 2004. All articles from the four previous volumes of the journal are now available at: http:
//hmongstudies.learnabouthmong.org/hmonstudjour2.html

The fourth volume (2003-2004) of the Hmong Studies Journal is now available in a special hard copy printing. This
volume includes additional artwork and census data not available on the Hmong Studies Journal website. This
printing was made possible by a grant from the Asian Pacific Community Endowment of the Saint Paul Foundation.
To learn more about obtaining a hard copy of Volume 4 of the Hmong Studies Journal please contact Mark Pfeifer
at 651-917-9937 or resources@hmongcenter.org

NEW BUILDING BRIDGES: TEACHING ABOUT THE HMONG IN OUR COMMUNITIES MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
OUTREACH PROGRAM:

Building Bridges - Teaching about the Hmong in our Communities Program

To respond to the need for community education about the Hmong refugee experience, Hmong refugees from Wat
Thamkrabok and Hmong contributions to Minnesota, the Hmong Cultural Center's Hmong Resource Center has
started a new program that provides comprehensive 90 minute multicultural education presentations about the
Hmong to groups in the Twin Cities community and Greater Minnesota.

Common topics of the interactive presentations in the Building Bridges program include Hmong History, Hmong
Role in the Secret U.S. War in Laos 1963-1975, Why the Hmong fled Laos as Refugees, Hmong resettlement to
the U.S. 1976-1995, Early Experiences of Hmong in Saint Paul and Minnesota, Important leaders in 20th century
Hmong history, Hmong contributions to Minnesota, Prominent and Successful Hmong-Minnesotans, Hmong Culture
(clans, music, agriculture, clothing), the Hmong Language, Hmong beliefs about Health and Medicine, Working with
Hmong-origin students and their Families, Hmong refugees in Wat Thamkrabok and their resettlement in the U.S.

Curriculum of presentations can be adjusted to meet the needs of particular groups. Presentations to health
professionals and educators also focus on the topics of cultural awareness training for work with clients of Hmong-
origin.

Arranged Presentations at the Cultural Center in Saint Paul are free of charge but optional donations are
requested by groups with institutional affiliations. Presentations at schools or organizations are available for a
standard fee. Diversity awareness presentations can also be given at corporations and other workplaces for a fee.
Please call 651-917-9937 and ask for Mark Pfeifer or Txong Pao Lee to discuss arranging a presentation at the
center or at your school or organization.

Hmong Cultural Center is also co-sponsoring Building Bridges workshops with the Minnesota Humanities
Commission. About 50 educators and service professionals attended the workshop held September 21, 2004 at
the Humanities Commission. Another Workshop will be held at the Humanities Commission October 27. To obtain
more information or to register visit: http://www.minnesotahumanities.org/Literacy/events.htm#buildingbridges

HMONG CULTURAL CENTER FUNDRAISING BANQUET OCTOBER 9, 2004 5-9 PM:

Hmong Cultural Center will be holding a fundraising banquet Saturday evening October 9 from 5 to 9 PM in Saint
Paul. All funds raised from this event will go to support the center’s cultural education programming. Tickets are
$35 per person with catering by Cheng Heng Cambodian restaurant. Please call 651-917-9937 and ask for Mark
Pfeifer or MayTong Chang if you are interested in attending and would like to make a reservation.

HMONG LANGUAGE CLASSES THIS FALL:

The Hmong Resource Center of the Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul will be starting another session of its
basic Hmong language class the week of October 4.

Basic Introduction to the Hmong Language: This class primarily intended for persons with no previous knowledge
whatsoever of the Hmong language will provide an introduction to the Hmong language (Romanized alphabet,
pronunciation, grammar), key phrases in Hmong and cultural orientation information about working with traditional
Hmong families. This class will meet on Monday nights for 10 weeks from 6 to 7:30 PM at the center starting
October 4.

Fees: Class fees are $60 for the 10 week semester.

To enroll in either class stop by the Hmong Cultural Center at 995 University Avenue, Suite 214, Saint Paul, MN
(Sunrise Market Building). Location info is at: www.hmongcenter.org. For more info call Mark Pfeifer at 651-917-
9937. An enrollment form is also online at: http://hmongstudies.learnabouthmong.org/Hmong%20Language%
20Class%20Fall%202004.htm

HMONG RESOURCE FAIR, OCTOBER 30, 2004 ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL:

Hmong Cultural and Resource Center is a cosponsor of the Third Annual Hmong Resource Fair Saturday, October
30, which will be held from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at Arlington Sr. High School’s Great Hall, 1495 Rice Street, in
St. Paul. This year's gathering is designed especially to reach the new refugees from Wat Tham Krabok, Thailand.

Bilingual staff from a wide range of organizations will be available to provide assistance to members of the Hmong
community and to those who work with them.

Information on health and nutrition, mental health, education, employment, legal and government services, as well
as many other services, will be available to participants.

There will be door prizes, refreshments, and cultural performances. This event is free and open to the public.

Co-sponsors: UCare MN, MN Dept. of Human Services, Hmong Cultural Center, St. Paul Public Schools, MN Dept.
of Revenue, Hmong American Partnership, Council on Asian-Pacific Minnesotans. U.S. Dept of Health and Human
Service-Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

For more information contact Kazoua Kong-Thao at 651-215-1278.

YOUTH PROGRAMS UPDATE:

Looking for some traditional Hmong culture to enliven your community event this Spring? The Hmong Cultural
Center’s Youth Qeej (Traditional Hmong Music) Troupe is available to perform for a fee. Persons interested in
scheduling performances may call Txong Pao Lee at 651-917-9937.

CITIZENSHIP PROGRAM UPDATE:

Need information about the citizenship process, study guides or application forms? Extensive citizenship-related
information is available on the Hmong Cultural Center website at www.hmongcenter.org/ The citizenship section of
the website includes examples of typical citizenship interview questions, as well as 100 sample citizenship exam
questions in both the English and Hmong languages. Up-to-date information is also provided about eligibility and
requirements pertaining to the Hmong Veterans’ Naturalization Act of 2000.

Hmong Cultural Center is a member of the federal and state funded Saint Paul Community Literacy Consortium
(SPCLC)

OUR SUPPORTERS:

Funding supporters of the Hmong Resource Center include the New York and Vermont-based Freeman
Foundation, the Bush Foundation, the Marbrook Foundation, the 3M Foundation/COMPAS Award for Innovation in
the Arts Program and the Asian Pacific Endowment of the Saint Paul Foundation.



HMONG STUDIES RESOURCE NEWSLETTER September/October 2004 Volume 2 Special Edition with Information
about Some New Publications and Special Events

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG RESOURCE CENTER OF THE HMONG CULTURAL CENTER

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Resource Newsletter provides up-to-date information about new
works in Hmong Studies and Hmong-related research resources. To access back issues of this unique online
publication visit: http://www.hmongcenter.org/hccnewsletter.html

HMONG 2000 CENSUS PUBLICATION: DATA AND ANALYSIS IS RELEASED BY HMONG CULTURAL CENTER AND
HMONG NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

WASHINGTON, DC AND SAINT PAUL, MN – Hmong National Development, Inc. (HND), a national nonprofit
organization developing capacity to ensure the full participation of Hmong Americans, in collaboration with the
Hmong Cultural Center in St. Paul, Minnesota has released a new Census data report and analysis on the Hmong
American community. “We are extremely pleased to make this report available. It will be an important tool for the
Hmong American community to reflect on our progress, and to think about our future,” states Pao Lo, HND Board
President.

The report is the first of its kind, combining the work of several Hmong and non-Hmong scholars to interpret
Census data in order to look at specific areas, such as, homeownership, education, and economic status. "Hmong
Cultural Center through our Hmong Resource Center has been very privileged to have had the opportunity to work
as a partner with Hmong National Development and several leading Hmong Studies scholars in the research and
production of this very important publication in Hmong-American Studies. The Hmong Census Report is the most
detailed analytical work that has ever been produced related to the demographics and educational and
socioeconomic status of Hmong-Americans. I believe this publication will be used as a reference work by scholars,
service providers, funders and community members for many years to come,” states Txongpao Lee, Executive
Director, Hmong Cultural Center.

***

The new census report contains the following articles:

HMONG POPULATION, DEMOGRAPHIC, SOCIOECONOMIC, AND EDUCATIONAL TRENDS IN THE 2000 CENSUS
By Mark E. Pfeifer, Ph.D. Hmong Resource Center and Serge Lee, Ph.D. California State University, Sacramento

HMONG FAMILIES IN AMERICA IN 2000: CONTINUITY AND CHANGE By Zha Blong Xiong, Ph.D. and Arunya
Tuicomepee, University of Minnesota

PROFILE OF HMONG EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT By Kou Yang, Ed.D., California State University, Stansislaus
and Mark E. Pfeifer, Ph.D., Hmong Resource Center

HMONG AMERICAN WOMEN.S EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR HMONG AMERICAN WOMEN
AND MEN By Halee Vang, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Minnesota

WHAT YOU CANNOT SEE IN THE U.S. 2000 CENSUS By Reverend Kou Seying (Kxf. Nyaj Kub Thoj), Formerly of
Concordia University, Saint Paul

CONTESTED ECONOMIC GROWTH AMONG HMONG AMERICANS By Chia Youyee Vang, Ph.D. Candidate,
University of Minnesota

HMONG HOMEOWNERSHIP: UP SHARPLY IN THE 1990S BUT STILL LAGGING IN THE CENTRAL VALLEY By
Michael Grover and Richard M. Todd, Federal Reserve Bank, Minneapolis

The new census report contains the following appendices with maps and data tables:

MAPS Map 1 . Hmong Americans by County 2000 Map 2 . Hmong by County 2000 (dot density) Map 3 . Hmong
Growth by State 1990 . 2000 Map 4 . Hmong Population Change by County for California 1990 . 2000 Map 5 .
Hmong Population Change by County for Minnesota 1990 . 2000 Map 6 . Hmong Population Change by County for
Wisconsin 1990 . 2000

TABLES Table 1: Hmong Population Table 2: U.S. Regions and States Table 2A: Hmong American Population
Table 3: Metropolitan Areas Table 4: Age Distribution Table 5: Gender Distribution Table 6: Household Size and
Household Size by Tenure Table 7: Year of Entry Table 8: Migration Table 9: Linguistic Isolation Table 10: Ability to
Speak English by Age Table 11: Types of Disability Table 12: Citizenship Status Table 13: Educational Attainment
Table 13A: Educational Attainment, Males Table 13B: Educational Attainment, Females Table 14: Housing Tenure
Table 15: Income Table 16: Median Earnings by Gender Table 17: Poverty Status in 1999 by Age Table 18: Public
Assistance Income in 1999 for Household Table 19: Employment Status Table 19A: Employment Status by Sex
Table 20A: Industry Distribution Table 20B: Industry Distribution (continued) Table 20C: Industry Distribution
(continued) Table 21A: Occupational Distribution, Males Table 21B: Occupational Distribution, Males (continued)
Table 21C: Occupational Distribution, Males (continued) Table 21D: Occupational Distribution, Females Table
21E: Occupational Distribution, Females (continued) Table 21F: Occupational Distribution, Females (continued)

Hmong National Development, Inc. (HND) is a national non-profit organization whose mission is “developing
capacity to ensure the full participation of Hmong in society”. HND works with local and national organizations,
public and private entities, and individuals to promote educational opportunities, to increase community capacity,
and to develop resources for the well-being, growth, and full participation of Hmong in society.

Hmong Cultural Center is a St. Paul, MN based organization with a nationally significant collection of Hmong
Studies related research (Hmong Resource Center) and a multicultural education focus. The mission of Hmong
Cultural Center is to promote the personal development of children, youth and adults through Hmong cultural
education while also providing resources to facilitate cross-cultural awareness and understanding between Hmong
and non-Hmong.

For census report ordering information, please contact Tong Lee at (202) 463-2118 or tong@hndlink.org

NEW BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY “THE STATE OF HMONG-AMERICAN STUDIES” AVAILABLE ONLINE:

A new bibliographic essay providing a discussion of important contemporary works and suggestions for future
research directions in Hmong-American Studies is available in PDF format at: http://hmongstudies.
learnabouthmong.org/State%20of%20Hmong-American%20Studies.pdf

In addition, a new selective annotated bibliography of Hmong-related works of interest to school and public libraries
is available in PDF format at: http://hmongstudies.learnabouthmong.org/Selective%20Bibliography%20for%
20School%20and%20Public%20Libraries.pdf

PROFESSOR DANIEL DETZNER LECTURES ON HIS NEW BOOK ELDER VOICES: SOUTHEAST ASIAN FAMILIES
IN THE UNITED STATES, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2004 AT IMMIGRATION HISTORY RESEARCH CENTER,
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA:

Southeast Asian Families in the United States: Using a Life History Approach to Study Elders and Families

Daniel Detzner, University of Minnesota Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, General College, Professor of Family
Social Science, and former director of The Refugee Studies Center. Detzner is author of Elder Voices: Southeast
Asian Families in the United States (Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 2004)

Tuesday, October 12, 2004, 5:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served Free and open to the public

Room 120, Elmer L. Andersen Library 222 - 21st Avenue South, Minneapolis For questions/directions/parking
options call the IHRC at 612-625-4800 or visit our Web site at www.ihrc.umn.edu

This program is made possible in part by the Friends of the IHRC, co-sponsored by the Hmong Resource Center (a
unit of the Hmong Cultural Center) and the University of Minnesota Asian American Studies Program, and
supported through a "Save America’s Treasures" grant from the US Department of the Interior, National Park
Service

To request disability accommodations, please contactthe IHRC office at 612-625-4800 The University of Minnesota
is an equal opportunity educator and employer

RSVP appreciated, but not required.

HMONG RESOURCE FAIR, OCTOBER 30, 2004 ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL:

Hmong Cultural and Resource Center is a cosponsor of the Third Annual Hmong Resource Fair Saturday, October
30, which will be held from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at Arlington Sr. High School’s Great Hall, 1495 Rice Street, in
St. Paul. This year's gathering is designed especially to reach the new refugees from Wat Tham Krabok, Thailand.

Bilingual staff from a wide range of organizations will be available to provide assistance to members of the Hmong
community and to those who work with them.

Information on health and nutrition, mental health, education, employment, legal and government services, as well
as many other services, will be available to participants.

There will be door prizes, refreshments, and cultural performances. This event is free and open to the public.

Co-sponsors: UCare MN, MN Dept. of Human Services, Hmong Cultural Center, St. Paul Public Schools, MN Dept.
of Revenue, Hmong American Partnership, Council on Asian-Pacific Minnesotans. U.S. Dept of Health and Human
Service-Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

For more information contact Kazoua Kong-Thao at 651-215-1278.