HMONG STUDIES NEWSLETTER

May/June 2005

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG RESOURCE CENTER OF THE HMONG CULTURAL CENTER



ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Resource Newsletter has for 5 years provided a very
unique and consistent source of up-to-date information about new works in Hmong Studies and Hmong-
related research resources. To access back issues of this online publication dating back to 2001 visit: http:
//www.hmongcenter.org/hccnewsletter.html



ABOUT THE HMONG RESOURCE CENTER:



The work of the Hmong Resource Center is to provide information to Hmong and non-Hmong for the
purpose of promoting positive race relations, human rights, multicultural education, information about cross-
cultural health and medicine, teacher education, family literacy education and community-based research.
The Hmong Resource Center is fairly unique in that it is a Hmong community organization-controlled
collection with both a community and a scholarly focus. The collection is located in the Hmong community,
above a Hmong grocery, and in a building with a large number of Hmong businesses and organizations,
making it highly accessible to both members of the community as well as students and scholars from the
wider community who through visiting have the opportunity to experience the Hmong community within a
primarily Hmong environment that is physically part of the community adding an important multicultural
learning and participatory dimension that is not available on any college campus.



The Hmong Resource Center of the Hmong Cultural Center is open to the public Monday through Friday
from 9 AM – 6 PM. The Hmong Resource Center is located in the Hmong Cultural Center’s offices at 995
University Avenue, Suite 214 in Saint Paul. Phone: 651-917-9937. E-Mail: resources@hmongcenter.org.
Online Resource Center Catalog: www.hmongcenter.org/ or www.hmongcenter.com/ Walk-ins are welcome
and there are many displays to look at that teach about the Hmong people, their history, their culture and
their experience in the U.S. over the past 25 years. Larger group tours and educational sessions may be
arranged in advance.



NEW WORKS IN HMONG STUDIES:



Books/Theses/Reports



Stacey J. Lee. (2005). Up Against Whiteness: Race, School, and Immigrant Youth. New York: Teachers
College Press. A comprehensive book-length ethnographic study of the experiences of Hmong youth
growing up in Wisconsin. Individual chapters in this new work discuss in-depth many important issues.
These issues include the interactions of Hmong students in a Wisconsin high school with teachers and
other students and the social constructions Hmong students encounter among teachers and administrators,
identity differences between “Traditional” and “Americanized” Hmong students, and how gender impacts
the experiences of Hmong-American youth.



Takeuchi Shosuke. (2005). Laos as Battlefield. Tokyo: Mekong Publishing. An important new work
featuring photographs and English/Japanese textual descriptions by a Japanese photojournalist who
according to the notes was the only photographer from a non-Communist country allowed to stay in Laos
from 1975 to 1982. Most of the photos in the volume follow the experiences of the members of a Hmong
Guerilla Unit in Laos beginning in 1973 up to the late 1990s. The author traveled to the United States to
take pictures of the some of the unit members and their families in the latter period. Also included are
numerous photos that show the conditions in Laos for the Hmong and others following the Communist
takeover of the country in 1975. This compilation is probably the first to feature photographs related to the
impact of the war on Hmong in Laos over a such a long continuous temporal period. Particularly unique are
the post-1975 photos included from Laos. The Hmong Resource Center thanks the author for donating this
impressive work to our collections.



Academic Journal Articles/Other



Debra Albus, Martha Thurlow, Kristin Liu and John Bielinski. (2005). “Reading Test Performance of English-
Language Learners Using an English Dictionary.” The Journal of Educational Research, 98(4): 245-254.
The authors of this study are associated with the National Center on Educational Outcomes at the
University of Minnesota. The study involved an examination of the effects of a simplified English dictionary
accommodation on the reading performance of Hmong English-Language Learners (ELLs). The
participants in the research project included a control group of 69 non-ELL students and an experimental
group of 133 Hmong ELLs from 3 urban middle schools in Minnesota.



Deborah Helsel, Marilyn Mochel and Robert Bauer. (2005). “Chronic Illness and Hmong Shamans.” Journal
of Transcultural Nursing, 16(2)(April 2005):150-154. The authors of this study conducted interviews with 11
Hmong Shamans in Central California diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension. Understanding the
shamans’ perspective on chronic illness was seen as a gateway to understanding how the broader Hmong
community perceived these conditions. The authors conclude the article with suggestions for patient
educators which include family and community involvement in care regimens and the use of descriptive
terminology to identify chronic diseases.



E.W. Wiewel (Et al). (2005). ``Injection Prevalence and Risks Among Male Ethnic Minority Drug Users in
Northern Thailand.” AIDS Care, 17(1)(January 2005): 102-110. The authors of this study describe and
compare socio-demographics, drug use, and sexual practices among 629 surveyed Karen, Ahha, Hmong
Lisu, and Lahu males admitted to the Northern Drug Treatment Center in Mae Rim Thailand. The authors
use their findings to posit recommendations for preventive education programs among minority groups in
Northern Thailand.



Zha Blong Xiong, Patricia A. Eliason, Daniel F. Detzner and Michael J. Cleveland. (2005). "Southeast
Asian perceptions of good adolescents and good parents." Journal of Psychology. The Journal of
Psychology, 139(2): 159-175. The authors of this study examined the extent to which Southeast Asian
immigrant parents and students agree on what it means to be a “good” parent and a “good” adolescent. 36
parents and 37 adolescents of Cambodian, Hmong, Lao, and Vietnamese heritage participated in a series
of focus groups. The authors’ findings suggest that ideas about good parents and good adolescents are
influenced by both the parents’ traditions and by adolescents’ acculturation to American values.



Yang Dao. (2005). “The Hmong Odyssey From Laos to America.” Speech Presented to the 10th Hmong
National Conference, Fresno, California, April 8, 2005. In the text of this speech, Dr. Yang Dao describes in
detail the historical events surrounding the final years of the Hmong involvement in the War in Laos and the
War’s aftermath as well as the diplomatic work that was done to make possible the resettlement of Hmong
refugees in Western countries in the mid-1970s. In the latter portion of the text, Dr. Yang Dao discusses the
distribution of Hmong across the world and Hmong advances in the United States. The Hmong Resource
Center thanks Dr. Yang Dao for donating a copy of his speech to our collections.



Christian Postert. (2004). “Completing or Competing? Contexts of Hmong Selfing/Othering in Laos.” In
Grammars of Identity/Alterity: A Structural Approach. Editors: Gerd Baumann and Andre Gingrich. New
York: Berghahn Books, pp. 101-111. This article discusses strategies of context-relative self-
representation adopted by Hmong villagers in Luang Prabang Province, Laos. The author observed that
Hmong villagers tend to use different constructions of Hmong identity as they interact with different social
settings. These different contexts include interactions with supralocal Laotian officials, formal interactions
with Hmong village officials and informal interactions among villagers. The author of the study conducted
fieldwork in a Hmong village from 2000-2001.



RESOURCE CENTER VISITOR UPDATE:



645 persons visited the Hmong Resource Center in just the first 4 months of 2005. 58% of these visitors
were Hmong and 42% were non-Hmong showing the very diverse user population of the center’s
collections. 131 of the 645 users (or 20%) of the visitors were affiliated with a college or university who
used the center’s comprehensive collections of scholarly books, theses/dissertations, journal articles and
newspaper articles in Hmong Studies for the purposes of research. In these first 4 months of the year,
visitors from 19 colleges and universities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and elsewhere used the collections
showing the collection’s importance as a unique scholarly resource for Hmong Studies academic research.
The largest number of student users (more than 20 from each institution) in the period were affiliated with
the University of Minnesota, Metropolitan State University and the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.



Significantly, the Resource Center’s equally strong levels of accessibility to both the Hmong and broader
communities are apparent in the fact that in the first 4 months of 2005, more than 100 Hmong refugees
newly arrived from Thailand also used the Resource Center primarily to check out ESL workbooks, Hmong
language literature and videos from our lending library.



HMONG CULTURAL CENTER AND RESOURCE CENTER FEATURED ON THE VOICE OF AMERICA:



The Voice of America, an international radio service affiliated with the U.S. government reported this week
about the Building Bridges Outreach Program, ESL program, and youth programs of Hmong Cultural
Center. Click the following link to read and listen to the Voice of America’s report about the important
programs of our center:



http://www.voanews.com/english/AmericanLife/2005-05-03-voa59.cfm



Hmong Cultural Center’s Adult Basic Education programs were also featured in a Voice of America report
last summer after it was announced that the Wat Tham Krabok refugees would be resettled in the U.S.



http://www.voanews.com/english/AmericanLife/archive/a-2004-07-30-41-1.cfm





HMONG RESOURCE CENTER PARTNERS WITH WWW HMONG HOMEPAGE:



The Hmong Resource Center has partnered with Craig Rice to provide up-to-date content related to
community educational events, Hmong resources and Hmong Studies for the WWW Hmong Homepage.
Craig Rice co-founded the WWW Hmong Homepage in early 1994. The website was one of the first to
provide substantive educational resources related to Hmong-Americans and Hmong around the world. The
WWW Hmong Homepage is still one of the most heavily visited and linked educational websites related to
the Hmong. To view the relaunched WWW Hmong Homepage visit: www.hmongnet.org



HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL HAS A NEWLY ENHANCED WEBPAGE:



The Hmong Studies Journal, the only peer-reviewed academic journal in Hmong Studies has a new
webpage which includes enhanced content. The new features include pages listing the more than 30
articles featured in the journal since 1996 by both topic and scholar name:



http://www.hmongstudies.com/HSJArticlesbyTopic.html

http://www.hmongstudies.com/HSJArticlesScholaName.html



The Hmong Studies Journal will publish Volume 7 in late Summer or Early Fall. The Hmong Studies Journal
is at:

http://www.hmongstudies.com/HmongStudiesJournal



HMONG STUDIES PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FOR ORDER:



In the past year the Hmong Resource Center of the Hmong Cultural Center has published four unique
scholarly publications – An Annotated Bibliography of Hmong-Related Works 1996-2004, Hmong 2000
Census Publication in collaboration with Hmong National Development and several scholars of Hmong-
American Studies and two issues of the Hmong Studies Journal. Further information about these
publications as well as ordering info is available at: http://www.hmongcenter.org/hmonposforsa.html



NEW HMONG STUDIES MESSAGE BOARD:

A new moderated message board intended as a forum for information about existing and new research
resources in Hmong Studies is available at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/



THE STATE OF HMONG-AMERICAN STUDIES PRESENTATION AVAILABLE ONLINE:



Notes from The State of Hmong-American Studies, a workshop presentation given by Mark Pfeifer of the
Hmong Resource Center at the 10th Hmong National Conference in Fresno, CA April 9, 2005 have been
posted online in PDF Format at:



http://hmongstudies.com/HNDPresentation2005.pdf



UPDATED CONTENT ADDED TO NEW LEARN ABOUT HMONG WEBSITE:



Hmong Cultural Center’s Hmong Resource Center has launched a new multicultural education website:
www.learnabouthmong.com. The new Learn about Hmong website uses online video clips and other
multimedia technologies to teach about the Hmong people, and promote a better understanding of the
Hmong people and their experience in Minnesota and the United States.



In the past month additional substantive content has been added to the LearnaboutHmong website, the new
features include a presentation related to general interest printed and online Resources pertaining to the
Hmong, a presentation with pictures and descriptive information about more than 50 traditional Hmong
cultural artifacts and a photo essay of Hmong community life in Minnesota. New video clips of Hmong Qeej
instrument songs, Paj Ntaub Embroidery, and funeral and marriage songs have been filmed and will be
posted in the near future as well.



LearnaboutHmong.com has been made possible by a grant from the 3M/COMPAS Award for Innovation in
the Arts Program and the Asian Pacific Endowment of the Saint Paul Foundation. To view the new content
(Resources Presentation, St. Paul Photo Essay and Artifacts Presentation) on the Learn about Hmong
website visit:



http://www.learnabouthmong.com or www.learnabouthmong.org





BUILDING BRIDGES: LEARNING ABOUT THE HMONG PRESENTATIONS SCHEDULED FOR
MAY/JUNE 2005



Information and a registration form for these comprehensive three hour workshops to be provided by
Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul May 27 and June 17 is available at:



http://hmongstudies.com/BBWorkshopsMayJune05Flyer.pdf



The Building Bridges outreach program is supported by grants from the Saint Paul Foundation, the Otto
Bremer Foundation and the Minnesota Humanities Commission with support from the National Endowment
for the Humanities



HMONG CULTURAL CENTER’S 2004 ANNUAL REPORT NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE:



Hmong Cultural Center’s 2004 Annual Report is now available online in PDF format. The report includes
listings of 2004 acquisitions in the Hmong Resource Center. The report may be visited at the following link:



http://www.hmongcenter.org/hccanrep.html



NEW FUNDING SUPPORT FOR HMONG CULTURAL CENTER:



In recent months, Hmong Cultural Center has been awarded new grants from the Otto Bremer Foundation
for the Building Bridges Outreach program, from the Community Capital Alliance to buy computers to teach
functional work English and computer literacy skills to ESL and Citizenship program students and from the
National Endowment for the Arts to produce videos and curriculum materials related to Hmong folk arts
forms in partnership with the Hmong American Institute for Learning. Hmong Cultural Center thanks these
funders for supporting our programs in multicultural education, adult basic education and cultural arts
education.



OUR SUPPORTERS:



Funding supporters of the Hmong Resource Center include the New York and Vermont-based Freeman
Foundation, the Marbrook Foundation, the 3M Foundation/COMPAS Award for Innovation in the Arts
Program and the Asian Pacific Endowment of the Saint Paul Foundation. The Building Bridges Outreach
program is supported by the Saint Paul Foundation and the Minnesota Humanities Commission.